In Case of Emergency – Dig

We are expecting 3-12 inches of snow. If I seem to disappear for a while, send the dogs to find me and dig. I’ll be under the snow.

I reside in the Mid-Atlantic where the shoreline and mountains are the outliers to cities and suburbs. My neck of the woods gets snow each winter and I can say with all truthfulness that 3″ is about it or any one snow occurrence. All of our weather (except August heat waves) can be considered moderate. Not too much, not too little. Enough snow to be a pain in the tuckus. Enough rain to moisten your basement. Enough wind to blow the siding off. But rarely enough to make you stock up on supplies and prepare for days of ‘going it on your own’.

Still, the effect of climate change is glaring. Yes, I said it. Climate Change! I don’t care whether or not climate change is a natural phenom or a man-made disaster. That simply isn’t the point here. The point is that the Mid-Atlantic climate has changed for the worse. The school where I work has already cancelled all classes after 5 pm today. It is only 3 o’clock and there is not a single snow flake on the ground. The snow won’t even start until after 8  tonight. Everyone is a little nervous. We are all used to the forecast of a lot and getting a little. But here lately, we get a lot.

Ohio derecho damage

Ohio derecho damage

Two years ago, we had a derecho. I had never even heard of such a thing. We get hurricanes all the time, but by the time we see them, they are full of rain and bluster but the bite is much weakened. Not the derecho. I can’t even explain to you the destruction I witnessed. Huge trees on the ground. No, they didn’t fall over. They looked as if someone had grabbed them and twisted them in half. For miles and miles and miles the damage was, simply put, everywhere. We lost power for 4 days.  Some folks  were without power for 10 days. The derecho was part of a heat wave. No AC, food rotted, no ice, trees everywhere. We traveled to a different county to find a restaurant with power. We stayed in hotel after the first three sleepless nights of heat. Bad weather is an understatement.

In 2010, we had a blizzard of epic proportions. So much of the nation was effected by the snow that we named it Snowmaggedon. We had about 36″ of snow. 36 inches of snow!! Not our wonderful 3 and forget it. My family – ALL OF THEM (I am talking Momma and cousins and such) came to rescue me. They walked from the main street for about 1/2 a mile in 36″ of snow to save me. I had already dug myself out so we drank tea instead :). Ok The Marine helped.

Snowmaggedon from space.

Snowmaggedon from space.

By the way, NOAA reports that 2009-10 was the highest snowfall for my area in recorded history. 77 freakin’ inches, 50 of which fell in one month. Just this past December, according to Weather.com we set a record for warmest calendar-day lows ever observed with a low of 62 degrees in December. Climate change.

So, the typical run on toilet paper and milk is actually warranted this time round. With highly unpredictable weather and electric service that takes a lickin’ but can’t keep tickin’, we are quite likely to find ourselves in a pickle. Although I still feel about 5″ is our max, we could just as easily get 12″ of snow. The kids will be out of school, again. I say again because this winter has been fraught with snow days.

The plan:

  • Stock up on supplies.
  • Stay safely off of the roads until the snow has stopped.
  • Eat lots of warming foods.
  • Play.
  • Watch tons of movies.
  • Charge every device we have (in case of emergency).
  • Identify some actual books with paper (in case of emergency).
  • Make hot chocolate.
  • Shovel lots of snow.
  • Play.
  • Make sure everyone has layers to wear and plenty of blankets in the event the power goes out.
  • Find a hotel (in case of emergency).
  • Bake cookies.
  • Start seedlings.
  • Play, eat and be merry.

Stay safe my lovelies.

(Featured image from WSB-TV Georgia)

What are your snow plans this winter?